Thursday, 21 August 2014

Let's fight ALS!





Donate Today

http://www.alsa.org/donate/


What is ALS?


Monday, 18 August 2014

Packing tips every traveler should know







I am sure many of us spend hours thinking about what to pack for short travels we make. So, last weekend I made a short trip to visit my uncle in San Antonio and after serving me dinner and he asked me, If I keep my hand carry ready for that unplanned journey most people Fear? .....At first I did not understand, but when I did, I could not wait to get home and revisit contents of my heavy suitcase(s)

here is what I did...


-Throw away all heavy items
Hatred, Envy, Greed, and Anger  (HEGA) are most heaviest and will make the journey unpleasant
This are heavy stones in our bags and only drag us down, keep checking your bag on a daily basis and if you find any of these, throw them away.

Quick tip: Start Accepting
Hatred, Envy, Greed and Anger is usually the gap between reality and your desire. If you start accepting this as they are, HEGA will disappear.

-Remove Attachments 
Renounce all attachments with things and people.... and please don't confuse renunciation with responsibilities or Love, you are still responsible for your family, work, community, try not to get attached.

Quick tip: Keep a very close eye on developing selfish attachments, enjoy the best in life but don't get attached.

-Remove Expectation = Gratitude
I hacked this too! You see, I would get disappointed and frustrated often because things did not work out the way I wanted, or people did not behave they way I desired, by removing my expectation the whole game changed. If you don't expect, you will be thankful for the smallest thing.

I discovered a new source of energy and love after throwing away unwanted items, I hope you will too.

So, what have you packed?

with Love & Gratitude.
Shahzad











Friday, 25 April 2014

Mindfulness with Chade-Meng Tan





Chande-Meng Tan's official job title at Google used to be "engineer"; these days, it's "jolly good fellow." (which nobody can deny)

Chade-Meng Tan is the incredible engineer at Google who created the personal development program with a difference: Search Inside Yourself
Tan's official job description at Google is to "enlighten minds, open hearts, create world peace," which he does by beautifully teaching an enrichment class for employees at the search engine's Silicon Valley headquarters. 

I had the opportunity to invite Meng to speak with YPO London members @ Google HQ to share how mindfulness can calm the mind, and positive mental habits can help us become better leaders.


Mindfulness with Meng, but first let me take a #selfie
Meng with Shahzad @ Google HQ

My personal journey into mindfulness and meditation began after my friend Guillaume Gauthereau introduced me to Vipassana meditation in 2012, the 10 day silent retreat (14 hours of meditation each day + one meal) truly changed my life. 

After returning from the retreat, I was looking for a book which I could share with our team at work and discovered Meng's book Search Inside Yourself  In this book,  Meng has translated the concepts of contemplative traditions into accessible, and understandable language.... SIY's amazing programme has everyday practical application, which was only benefiting Google till Meng opened the doors to this Google-based program for everyone via his Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute or SIYLI. You can find the full course online.





Mindfulness or awareness is a spiritual or psychological faculty that, according to the teaching of the Buddha, is of great importance in the path of enlightenment. 

Mindfulness is a way of paying attention to the present moment, using techniques like meditation, breathing and yoga. It helps us become more aware of our thoughts and feelings so that instead of being overwhelmed by them, we’re better able to manage them.
Practising mindfulness can give people more insight into their emotions, boost their attention and concentration and improve relationships. It’s proven to help with stress, anxiety, depression and addictive behaviours